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Nursing Home Quality of Care Addressed in Latest OIG Report

The Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Inspector General (“OIG”) released the March 2014 edition of Compendium of Priority Recommendations, (“Compendium“) which for the first time addressed the need for reform in nursing home care. The Office of the Inspector General is required under the Inspector General Act of 1978, to report to Congress problems, abuses, and deficiencies, which still need to be addressed, as well as the duties listed in the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 which requires the reporting of the top 25 unimplemented recommendations that best protect the integrity of the Health and Human Services programs. It is common for OIG recommendations to require legislative, regulatory, or administrative action to become policy. Even Congressional appeal can be required, especially if financial backing is necessary to implement the new ideals. As I have reported before when it comes to elder abuse tracking the problem can be one of the biggest challenges. That is why as a nursing home injury specialist I was pleased to see the latest Compendium specifically addressing “Medicare Quality of Care and Safety Issues.” Three areas of concern were included in the Compendium regarding nursing home reform, (1) improving quality of care plans and discharge procedures in nursing homes, (2) decreasing preventable harm and hospitalization of nursing home residents, and (3) improve emergency response and preparedness in nursing homes. While these recommendations may be incorporated in future elder abuse studies and possibly help to reform elder abuse rights, for many the help can come too late. If you or a loved one were seriously injured, neglected, or abused as a resident in a nursing home in Pennsylvania or New Jersey, our dedicated team of nursing home injury specialists may be able to help you get the compensation you deserve.

Improve Care Plans Improve Nursing Home Safety

Of the three proposed areas of nursing home reform, I found the quality of care plans and oversight to be of particular importance as it spells out the individualized plan of care that the resident is to receive. A care plan can assist in tracking any significant changes of the resident, including their mental, physical, and emotional health. The individualized care plan is also important as it details what kind of medication and what level of supervision the resident needs. For instance, a person who has dementia will need different care from someone who is bedridden, yet without proper supervision both resident’s health could greatly suffer. Insufficient care plans are also costly to both the government and private nursing homes. The Compendium report found that Medicare paid approximately $5.1 billion in 2009 for stays in which the nursing home did not meet quality-of-care requirements. Oversight for care plans and implementation is also an area that needs to be focused and addressed on a state and federal level according to the report. Nearly 37 percent of nursing home care plans do not meet federal requirements and the report also found that services were not provided as specified by the care plans. Increased oversight alone has a tremendous opportunity to help decrease instances of low quality of care in nursing homes. To read more about the areas for improvement and suggestions in long term care by the Office of the Inspector General read the latest issue of the March 2014 edition of Compendium of Priority Recommendations.

Nursing home abuse can lead to serious and life threatening injuries. If you or a loved one has recently suffered a nursing home injury, and would like more information regarding personal injury representation, and to determine whether you have grounds for a case, please contact us online or call 1 800 7 LEGAL 7 for a Free Case Evaluation.

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