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Pennsylvania Counties Increasingly Consider Selling Their Public Nursing Homes

Because I practice nursing home abuse law in Pennsylvania, I was interested to see that publicly owned nursing homes are rapidly dwindling in our state. According to the Pocono Record, Monroe County’s government is considering selling its publicly owned Pleasant Valley Manor, in part because it’s running at a loss. To the west, Franklin County is already in the process of selling its nursing home, Falling Spring Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. One Monroe County Commissioner, Charlie Garris, noted that the trend in Pennsylvania counties is increasingly toward selling county-owned homes. But residents of both counties expressed concerns about the quality of care in the homes as they transitioned from public, nonprofit ownership to private, for-profit ownership. The news comes on the heels of an announcement from the Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia that it will sell several nursing homes in greater Philadelphia.

In Monroe County, the commissioners are considering a sale because the home is losing money. Pleasant Valley Manor lost $940,000 in 2012 and had already lost the same amount in the first six months of 2013. Garris noted that a supplier of food to the home once withheld its deliveries until it got paid, suggesting that the home’s administrators were behind on payment. The only commissioner to publicly oppose a sale is Suzanne McCool, who said the county has a moral obligation to take care of elderly and infirm residents. The article said “there’s a fear” that a for-profit home might not take indigent residents.

In Franklin County, Commissioner Robert Ziobrowski said county-run homes are no longer needed for indigent Pennsylvanians, because Americans can now rely on Medicare and Medicaid as well as private insurance. They have chosen two finalists from among the 10 private companies that offered to buy Falling Spring. But according to the local newspaper, Franklin County residents are concerned that private ownership will result in a drop in quality of care.

I share that concern. In my experience pursuing nursing home neglect lawsuits in eastern Pennsylvania, there is genuine cause for concern when nonprofit homes are sold to for-profit companies. As I noted in my blog post about the Catholic Church’s sale of homes, studies show that nonprofit homes do better on multiple measures of care, including staffing ratios, number of bedsores, citations from government regulators and more. Indeed, one study concluded that statistically, for-profit ownership leads to an additional 7,000 pressure sores a year. The difference may be attributed to things like attempting to get along with fewer employees or employees who are not well trained, both of which can lead to overwhelmed employees who cut corners or forget important tasks. Nursing home abuse is devastating and sometimes fatal; Pennsylvanians should think very carefully before doing anything that could lead to more of it.

Based in Philadelphia, Rosenbaum & Associates represents clients across eastern Pennsylvania who have suffered serious injuries from abuse or neglect at a nursing home.

If you’d like to talk to us about your situation and your options, call us today for a free consultation at 1-800-7-LEGAL-7 or send us an email.

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