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Residents of Catholic Philadelphia Nursing Homes Face Uncertain Future Due to Sale

As a Pennsylvania nursing home lawyer, I was interested to see reports that the Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia plans to sell six nursing homes in greater Philadelphia. According to the Philadelphia Daily News, the archdiocese is selling six nursing homes and one assisted-living facility in order to address financial problems. Three of the homes are in Philadelphia: Immaculate Mary Home, St. John Neumann Home and St. Monica Manor. St. Martha Manor and Villa St. Martha are in Chester County, St. Francis Country House is in Delaware County, and St. Mary Manor is in Montgomery County. The announcement comes after several years of financial problems for the archdiocese. The National Catholic Reporter said the homes ran a deficit of $1.4 million at the end of fiscal year 2012.

In all, 1,400 residents will be affected by the proposed sales, as well as more than 2,000 employees. The archbishop for Philadelphia, Charles Chaput, said it will be a condition of the sale that no residents will be evicted, and “every effort will be made” to retain employees. As a Philadelphia injury lawyer, I am concerned for these residents and employees, because a sale is likely to mean a change to for-profit status. Studies show that nonprofit nursing homes generally deliver higher-quality care than for-profit homes, as measured by factors like citations by government regulators, use of restraints, number of bedsores the residents sustain, and staffing ratios. A 2009 meta-study published in the British Medical Journal drew that conclusion, echoing 2002 and 1991 studies. Among other things, it said, there are 7,000 pressure sores per year that can be attributed to for-profit care, statistically speaking.

It’s not a given that for-profit status inevitably leads to Pennsylvania nursing home abuse, but if I had a loved one in one of these Catholic facilities, I would watch the sales closely. In my experience as a Philadelphia medical malpractice lawyer, for-profit status can lead to neglect when profit-motivated owners choose to understaff their homes or hire cheaper, unskilled workers. Overworked employees may skip or simply forget needed care, leading to problems like bedsores, missed medications or lack of attention to basic nutrition and hydration. In more serious cases, nursing home employees have been known to steal residents’ drugs, physically abuse them or overuse psychiatric drugs as “chemical restraints” against unruly dementia patients. All of these are forms of abuse and neglect in nursing homes, which no Philadelphia family should have to experience.

If your family has suffered a serious injury or a death because of neglect or abuse at a nursing home in eastern Pennsylvania, don’t wait to call Rosenbaum & Associates for a free consultation. You can reach us through our website or call toll-free at 1-800-7-LEGAL-7.

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