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Texas Supreme Court Rules Expert Report Required to File Any Medically Related Tort – PM Management-Trinity NC v. Kumets

I’ve written here before as a Philadelphia medical malpractice lawyer about the onerous requirements in many states for filing a medical malpractice claim. Medical malpractice is a common assertion in cases of Pennsylvania nursing home abuse, but it’s so politicized that it’s much more difficult to file a medical negligence claim than it is to file a general negligence claim. Among other things, plaintiffs in many states, including Pennsylvania, must file an expert’s affidavit with the lawsuit to show that at least one expert believes the case has merit. A missing or inadequate affidavit is a reason for the dismissal of many medical malpractice lawsuits, and that was the problem in PM Management-Trinity NC v. Kumets, a Texas Supreme Court case that found an affidavit is needed even for a non-malpractice claim based on the same facts as the malpractice claim.

Yevgenia Kumets was admitted to a nursing home in Texas to recover from a stroke. While she was there, she suffered a second stroke. Some of her family believed that poor care she suffered at the home was responsible for the second stroke, though the opinion doesn’t detail their complaints. However, she was discharged from the home after the family complained about her treatment, leading the family to believe she was retaliated against. The Kumets family sued with claims for medical negligence, ordinary and gross negligence, negligence with employees, breach of fiduciary duty and contract, fraudulent billing, violations of the state Deceptive Trade Practices Act and retaliation, as authorized by a statute. They filed an expert report, but the court ruled it was deficient and an amended report didn’t cure the defects. The court dismissed all their claims except retaliation.

The two sides cross-appealed, arguing that various claims were or were not health care liability claims subject to the expert affidavit requirement. A divided Court of Appeals affirmed the ruling, saying a health care liability claim must involve “injury or death of the claimant,” and the retaliation claim asserted only economic loss.

The Texas Supreme Court reversed that decision, siding with the dissent in the Court of Appeals. The high court had previously held that any claim based on the same underlying facts as a health care liability claim is also a health care liability claim, and thus subject to the expert report requirement. As the court had noted in a prior case, 2010’sYamada v. Friend, Texas law does not permit plaintiffs to circumvent the expert report requirement through “artful pleading” or splitting claims. It noted that it was not holding that all retaliation or discrimination claims are health care liability claims, or even that the breach of fiduciary duty claim brought by the Kumetes is such a claim. But the Kumetses did not appeal the dismissal of that claim, the court said. It reversed the Court of Appeals and remanded with orders to dismiss the retaliation claim.

As a Pennsylvania nursing home lawyer, I think this ruling will not do any favors to Texas patients who have suffered serious injuries from abuse or neglect in a nursing home. The expert affidavit requirement is expensive and time-consuming at a time when victims are already facing a deadline and, often, high medical bills and relocation costs related to the underlying abuse. It also inappropriately shifts extra burdens to the plaintiff, because no expensive expert is required to certify that the defense’s arguments have merit. Applying it to claims that are not about medical malpractice makes it harder to recover fair compensation–and easier for nursing homes to continue providing shoddy care. As a Philadelphia injury lawyer, I don’t believe it’s good for anyone to protect bad nursing homes from consequences.

If someone you love suffered a serious injury because of nursing home negligence, don’t wait to call Rosenbaum & Associates for a free consultation. You can tell us your story and learn more about your options by calling 1-800-7-LEGAL-7 or sending us an email.

Similar blog posts:

Family Alleging Nursing Home Neglect May Make Ordinary Negligence Claim – Southwell v. Summit View of Farragut

Delaware Supreme Court Resurrects Nursing Home Lawsuit Missing Expert’s C.V. – Dishmon v. Fucci

Texas High Court Rules Nursing Home Claim Is Medical Malpractice Under State Law – Omaha Healthcare Center v. Johnson

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