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Federal Report Finds ‘Huge Number’ of Younger People Unnecessarily in Nursing Homes

As a Pennsylvania nursing home lawyer, I was interested to see a report criticizing the states for overusing nursing homes for disabled but younger people. According to McKnight’s Long-Term Care News, a report from the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee found that states are not living up to a 14-year-old obligation to transition working-age and younger people out of nursing homes. The obligation was created by a 1999 court ruling in Olmstead v. L.C., which was based on the states’ obligation to integrate disabled people into society under the Americans With Disabilities Act. Fourteen years later, the Senate HELP Committee investigation found that almost a quarter of a million of working-age disabled adults are in nursing homes. In fact, the committee’s press release said, the number of institutionalized disabled adults is actually growing. It called for actions that would provide community care for more disabled adults.

The Olmstead ruling found that the ability to live within the community is a protected civil right for disabled people under the ADA. Thus, states were asked to transition non-elderly disabled people out of nursing homes if they were able to live independently with some help. But according to the committee report, states are reporting very little progress. Of all 50 states, the report said, only 12 are spending more than half of their Medicare funds on community-based care rather than institutional care. As the committee’s press release notes, this is especially disappointing because institutionalization is more expensive than community-based care. It’s also less popular among the patients themselves, the press release said. The federal report came less than a week before the federal government sued the state of Florida for “warehousing” disabled children in nursing homes unnecessarily.

In my experience as a Philadelphia injury lawyer, this problem is not limited to working-age adults or children. Frequently, disabled elderly people are able to live at home with some help, but the systems aren’t in place to make that possible. This forces them to leave home, often against their will, and accept far more expensive institutional care under Medicaid. That’s especially disturbing because nursing homes are not necessarily safer than living at home. Away from loved ones or neighbors who know them, and in the care of facilities that stretch their staffs too thin, patients can become victims of Pennsylvania nursing home abuse. And the abuse can lead to even more serious health problems, including expensive hospitalization or chronic problems that could truly require an institution. As a Philadelphia medical malpractice lawyer, I think Pennsylvania’s disabled people, seniors or not, deserve better.

If your family has suffered a serious injury or lost a loved one because of negligence by a nursing home, you should call Rosenbaum & Associates today to discuss your case and your rights. For a free consultation, call 1-800-7-LEGAL-7 or send us a message online.

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