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Judge Dismisses Nursing Home Neglect Lawsuit Against Bucks County

As a Philadelphia medical malpractice lawyer, I was interested to read about a recent court ruling involving a suburban Philly nursing home. According to McKnights Long-Term Care News, a federal judge has dismissed a case against Neshaminy Manor, a home run by Bucks County. The lawsuit alleged that negligent practices at the nursing home led to injuries and eventually the death of Almira Will. Will depended on an oxygen tank, but her daughter, Lauretta Notwick, alleged that she frequently found the tank empty or turned off when she visited. The federal judge in the case granted a dismissal to Bucks County, ruling that the county is not legally responsible for injuries that do not stem from county policy, and that no policy appears to have led to Will’s injuries.

Will had end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a condition that required her to have constant oxygen from a tank. She was admitted to Neshaminy Manor in August of 2008 after breaking her hip. Notwick’s lawsuit alleged that during visits, she frequently found her mother’s oxygen tank turned off or empty. She claimed that this was a result of a Bucks County policy saying staff “may” replace oxygen cylinders with needles halfway into the red zone that signals a need for a refill. The federal judge, Lynne Sitarski, ruled that the nursing staff may have provided poor care, but the Bucks County policy was not to blame because it left the replacement time up to staff discretion. Notwick also argued that staff negligence led to Will falling numerous times while at Neshaminy Manor, once breaking her hip again. But the judge ruled that Bucks County is not liable for this because there’s no evidence that allowing Will to fall was a result of county policy.

As a Pennsylvania nursing home lawyer, I hope this family continues to pursue the lawsuit. The article doesn’t make clear who exactly was sued, but typically, the nursing home is legally responsible for its employees’ behavior. With private homes, that’s true regardless of whether the employees were carrying out policy or simply making bad choices. The rules may change because this home is part of the Bucks County government, but in general, government employees are not immune to lawsuits. Of course, Notwick can also sue the employees who provided negligent care as individuals, but suing them as individuals does nothing to induce their superiors to make (or enforce) policies that avoid Pennsylvania nursing home abuse. Individuals also have far less money, which may be an issue for this family if they suffered significant financial losses from the bad care, such as high medical bills and funeral expenses. As a Philadelphia injury lawyer, I would be interested to see whether this ruling is revisited.

If your family has suffered an injury or a loss because of bad care in a nursing home, don’t wait to call Rosenbaum & Associates for a free, confidential consultation. Based in Philadelphia, we represent clients across eastern Pennsylvania who have been abused or neglected by caregivers. To learn more, call us today at 1-800-7-LEGAL-7 or send us a message online.

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