Published on:

West Virginia High Court Finds Arbitration Clause Signed by Health Care Surrogate Unenforceable – State ex rel, AMFM, LLC v. Circuit Court

As a Pennsylvania nursing home lawyer, I was interested to see a decision from neighboring West Virginia voiding an arbitration contract signed by the patient’s health care surrogate. In State ex re. AMFM, LLC v. Circuit Court, Nancy Belcher was the designated health care surrogate of Beulah Wyatt. Wyatt died after 10 months in the McDowell Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, and Lelia Baker sued the home for negligence she said contributed to Wyatt’s death. Belcher signed a contract including an arbitration agreement when Wyatt entered the home, and McDowell moved to enforce the arbitration agreement in Kanawha County court. But that court found that Belcher, as a health care surrogate, had no authority to waive Wyatt’s right to a jury trial, and the West Virginia Supreme Court agreed.

Wyatt’s doctor determined in September of 2009 that Wyatt was not capable of making her own health decisions, so the doctor selected Belcher, Wyatt’s daughter, as a health care surrogate. A few days later, Wyatt was admitted to McDowell, a process that required Belcher to sign many documents. Among them was an agreement to litigate any disputes solely through binding arbitration. Wyatt stayed at the home 10 months, during which time Baker–another of her daughters and the representative of her estate–alleges that she developed malnutrition, dehydration, bedsores, infections and other injuries Baker believes led to Wyatt’s death. Baker sued in December of 2011, and McDowell moved to dismiss and enforce the arbitration agreement. The circuit court denied this motion, concluding that Belcher had authority to make medical decisions, but that signing the arbitration agreement was not such a decision. It also rejected an apparent authority argument, saying a later power of attorney assignment, was suspect given Wyatt’s diminished capacity.

McDowell appealed to the West Virginia Supreme Court, requesting a writ of prohibition stopping enforcement of this judgment. The high court investigated whether a valid arbitration agreement exists, and concluded that it does not. Health care surrogacy was created by the state legislature as a process for authorizing health care decisions for incapacitated adults. The law defines health care decisions as a decision to give, withhold or withdraw informed consent to health care. Belcher herself signed a form accepting the authority to make “medical decisions” for Wyatt. Nowhere is the authority extended to legal rights. Thus, the high court said, it’s clear that a health care surrogate has no authority to sign an arbitration form–particularly since this one was designated as optional and thus not a prerequisite to receiving health care. Thus, the high court declined to stop enforcement.

As a Philadelphia injury lawyer, I’m pleased to see this ruling. The opinion itself notes that its decision is in line with many other jurisdictions that have considered the issue of a health care surrogate, or a medical power of attorney, signing an arbitration agreement. People with full power of attorney may have the capacity to waive jury trial rights, but Belcher was not such a person. This is particularly important because entering a nursing home is often done when the patient herself is not competent to sign, and the family members may not fully understand the issues, even if they do have the power to sign. As a Philadelphia medical malpractice lawyer, it’s my experience that people who lack capacity are often those most vulnerable to Pennsylvania nursing home abuse, since they have a limited capacity to defend themselves or even notify loved ones about abuse.

Rosenbaum & Associates represents victims of nursing home abuse and negligence across eastern Pennsylvania. If your family has suffered injuries, illness or death because of someone else’s negligence, don’t wait to call us for help. You can reach us through our website or call toll-free at 1-800-7-LEGAL-7.

Similar blog posts:

Consolidated Opinion in West Virginia Nursing Negligence Cases: Could Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) Also Impact Your Case?

Florida Supreme Court Rules Courts Must Decide Whether Nursing Home Arbitration Applies – Shotts v. OP Winter Haven

Alabama High Court Remands Arbitration Dispute In Case of Delayed Motion to Arbitrate – Aurora Healthcare Inc. v. Ramsey

Contact Information