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Authorities Charge Eastern Pennsylvania Nursing Home Employees With Criminal Neglect

I was disappointed to see a recent report of Pennsylvania nursing home abuse so serious that it led to criminal charges. The Altoona Mirror, a community newspaper in western Pennsylvania, reported Sept. 26 that the former owner of Warner’s Home for the Aged and two ex-employees of the home were charged with neglect by a grand jury in the case of Kenneth McGuire. McGuire was 80 when he died from complications of serious neglect by the home’s employees. His hospitalization and death led to the revocation of the home’s license in December of 2011. Now facing charges of neglect of a care-dependent person are ex-owner Sherry Jo Warner, 64, and ex-employees Diana Frye, 62, and Marjory Koch, 44.

McGuire had lived in the home five years before he was admitted to the hospital on Nov. 5, 2011. A doctor’s visit in July of that year had turned up nothing worse than a small sore on his leg. However, McGuire’s condition deteriorated in the months after, requiring him to move from using a cane to walk to using a wheelchair. As a result, he needed more intense care, including regular turning to prevent pressure sores as well as basic care like bathing and feeding. After his hospital admission, it became clear that he had not received that care in some time. His toes and shins were covered in pressure sores, and one foot was gangrenous. He was also covered in dried urine and feces when he was admitted to the hospital, and he was dehydrated, malnourished and suffering from sepsis. His doctor and the staff at the medical center testified that he was in worse shape than any other nursing home patient they had seen.

As a Pennsylvania nursing home lawyer, I’m sorry to say that this story sounds familiar to me. Pressure sores (also known as bedsores and decubitus ulcers) are a very common condition in nursing homes because the homes deal with so many people who have limited mobility. They are simple to prevent–caregivers must turn the patient regularly–but this is time-consuming. As a Philadelphia injury lawyer, I know many of the for-profit nursing homes cut their staffs, or the quality of their staffs, in an attempt to save money, and keeping up with important duties like this gets more difficult as a result. I believe the safety of patients should be prioritized above profit for the home’s corporate parent, and I’m glad we have laws enforcing that even when the caregivers fail in this most basic duty.

If your family has suffered a loss or a serious injury at an abusive or neglectful nursing home, don’t hesitate to call Philadelphia medical malpractice lawyer David Rosenbaum to discuss a lawsuit. You can call Rosenbaum & Associates for a free consultation at 1-800-7-LEGAL-7 or send us a message online.

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