Recently in nursing home abuse Category

March 19, 2014

Oklahoma Legislature Tackles Nursing Home Reform


Earlier last week, nursing home advocates took to the Oklahoma governor's office in hopes of initiating desperately needed nursing home reform talks. Of particular importance a meaty Oklahoma nursing home reform Bill, which sought to address many elder abuse and neglect concerns, was defeated last month. As a Pennsylvania and New Jersey nursing home abuse attorney I was interesting in a proposed Oklahoma House Bill 2901 much of which was geared towards supplementing elder care resources as a means of preventing nursing home abuse and neglect. House Bill 2901 was tailored to increase nursing home staff, create medical director oversight, and other measures. The House Bill did not make it to committee, but it did help shed light on staggering cases of elder abuse that on average is greatly underreported. The Oklahoma based grassroots long-term care reform organization, A Perfect Cause, estimates that more than 3,500 nursing home residents in Oklahoma die each year from nursing home abuse and neglect. The House Bill 2901 would have address preventable deaths and injuries in two separate areas of interest, mandated increased nursing staff, and the state required investigation of family members and the accused, while investigating elder abuse claims. As reported by Oklahoma's Own News 9, there were disagreements in the language and content of the bill, but lawmakers look optimistically to the next session in which to work out their disagreements. Wes Bledsoe, an advocate for nursing home reform, and President and Co-Founder of A Perfect Cause, estimates that about 62,000 cases of nursing abuse goes unreported nationwide. Underreporting is one of the many hurdles in addressing nursing home abuse and elder abuse on both a state and federal level.

Nursing home abuse reform has remained in Oklahoma's legislature since the December 2012, disturbing nursing home abuse that was caught on tape. A hidden camera in 96-year-old Eryetha Mayberry's nursing home room exposed the devastating abuse she was being subjected to on a daily basis by members of the nursing staff. Mayberry suffered from dementia, which requires greater care and more supervision as the patient's capacities diminish. Dementia patients are particularly vulnerable to unscrupulous residents and staff members in nursing homes that take advantage of a patient, knowing full well that their victim will not be able to fully recall the transgressions. Mayberry's daughter, Earlene Adkisson, installed the camera after she believed items were disappearing from her mother's room. The extreme instances of abuse caught on camera including rough handling, choking, blocking the resident's airways and more, totally shocked and horrified Mayberry's family. The reported images left many questioning whether "granny cams" or monitoring devices were needed to keep themselves and their loved one's safe. Oklahoma lawmakers say they have seen a rise in proposed legislation for the installation and monitoring of cameras in common areas of nursing homes. However, informed consent for monitoring in nursing homes is a complicated legal terrain, as you have to balance the general welfare of the residents and the individual resident's right to privacy. Many opponents strongly believe that the safer alternative is to add more quality staff to help ease the burden of daily care.

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March 12, 2014

Distilling the 2014 Nursing Home Ratings by U.S. News & World Report



When a family makes the decision to transition a loved one into a nursing home it can be an overwhelming and understandably emotional experience. The daily care, safety, and overall wellbeing of your loved one are being placed in the hands of another. It is a duty that many nursing home staffs and facilities pride themselves in excelling in. U.S. News & World Report has released their sixth annual data and ratings results of nearly every nursing home in the United States. The search tools and valuable information within the detailed U.S. News database can help make choosing a nursing home a better, quicker, safer, more informed experience. The user-friendly search tools gives a multi-layer approach in finding a suitable nursing home that meets the needs for you or a loved one. It is estimated that over 3 million Americans live in approximately 16,000 nursing homes throughout the United States. That number is expected to only increase as the nation's older adult population continues to steadily climb. Much of the raw data relied on by U.S. News in rating nursing homes comes from Nursing Home Compare, the federal database detailing every Medicare and Medicaid certified nursing home in the country. You can search by state, region, city, or zip code, or by a numerical star rating of 1 to 5. The 2014, ratings of 1,893 nursing homes in Pennsylvania indicate that 702 nursing homes, about 25 percent, earned a five-star rating, while less than 5 percent of Pennsylvania nursing homes earned a one-star rating.

Distilling the ratings:

There are three key areas that the overall ratings correlate to, the nursing home's individual ratings of their (1) state-conducted health inspections, (2) sufficient nursing staff and, (3) the quality medical care measures. As a nursing home injury specialist with practices in both Pennsylvania and New Jersey, when looking at a nursing home's overall rating, I place particular importance on a nursing home's nursing staff rating. The nurse staff rating relates to the average number of hours per day of care received per resident from nurses and physical therapists. A nursing home with a low rating for nursing staff raises concerns as understaffing is the leading cause of neglect and abuse in nursing homes and long care facilities. When a nursing home is inadequately staffed the required daily care to stave off fatal infections, pressure sores, devastating falls, and to meet the minimal quality of care required by both federal and state regulation, is often found lacking. Sufficient staffing is a critical component in running a safe, clean, well managed nursing home, so much so that all nursing homes participating in Medicare are required to meet specified requirements of the Federal Nursing Home Reform Act, part of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987. Specifically facilities are legally required to have "sufficient nursing staff to provide nursing and related services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being of each resident." Therefore, when narrowing down the choices of a nursing home facility remember to pay close attention to the nursing home's staff rating, as this singular component can have life-altering effects.

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November 19, 2013

Domestic Violence in Later Life


On Wednesday, November 13, a domestic violence incident was reported that both stuck out in my mind, and remained there over the weekend, as it pertained to domestic violence in couples over the age of 80. The article, "Husband Charged With Fatally Stabbing His Wife In Cinnaminson" as reported by CBS news, detailed how 83-year-old William Coggins had been formerly charged with murder in the violent death of his 81-year-old wife, Laura Coggins. According to the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office, Cinnaminson Police were called to the 55-and-over community on the morning of November 4th, after the husband's brother discovered the lifeless body of Laura Coggins fully clothed in her bathroom with multiple knife wounds. An autopsy later performed confirmed that Laura Coggins' death was a homicide and a result of the multiple stab and slash wounds she sustained. William Coggins, whose bail has been set at $500,000, with a court ordered psychiatric evaluation as a condition of his bail, was taken to a local area hospital for treatment before being taken into police custody. Mr. Coggins was treated for self-inflicted wounds, which were deemed as a result of an apparent suicide attempt. Two of Coggins' neighbors in the 55-and-over community, days after news broke of the homicide were shocked. They described Laura Coggins as "one of the nicest people you would ever meet." Further stating that Laura lived in the home with her husband and that the couple were "very private."

Elder domestic violence can happen to anyone, regardless of race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, socio-economics, and culture. Isolation in particular can become the breeding ground for abuse in older couples. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, somewhere between 1 and 2 million residents in the United States aged 65 and older have been abused, neglected, or exploited by a person with whom they depend on for care or protection. Even with such a staggering number of instances of abuse in older Americans, reports to police and other social services remains minimal. The largest cited reason to not report is the coupled fear that 1) financially the older American cannot sustain their quality of life on their own, and 2) that by the victim reporting the abuse, they believe it will lead to them no longer being able to live in their own home, further stripping them of their freedoms that they currently enjoy.

Another added wrinkle to elder domestic violence is that typically loved ones are the perpetrators. Nine out of ten of the substantiated incidents reported to Adult Protective Services, were caused by family members. In the instances of abuse reported to Adult Protective Services, the perpetrators were spouses or former spouses, domestic partners, adult children, and extended family, with just a slim margin being committed by hired caregivers. Typically domestic violence studies stop short of including couples who are over the age of forty-five, which makes getting a clear picture of the problem all that more difficult. A 2007 study by the American Bar Association entitled "Elder Abuse and Domestic Violence in Later Life," found that elder abuse statistics are alarming. The study held that 84 percent of elder abuse cases are never reported, and as many as 5 million older Americans are abused each year in the United States. Without a legislative push for change in elder abuse laws, the number of older Americans suffering abuse at the hand of a loved one, is set to steadily rise. By the year 2050, a historic change will occur when for the first time in history there will be a greater number of older people on earth than children.

The Philadelphia based law firm of Rosenbaum and Associates works closely with victims of nursing home abuse in order to help residents regain their quality of life and restitution for their injuries. However, not all-elder abuse occurs in a nursing home or long-term facility. The National Institute of Justice, in their June 2013 research brief, found that the vast majority of older Americans choose to reside in their domestic settings, with only about 3 percent residing in nursing homes or long-term care facilities. Accordingly, 89 percent of elder abuse reported to Adult Protective Services occurs in domestic settings. Elder abuse can go undetected for longer periods of time as protective social networks; such as school or work, is no longer part of an older American's everyday life. Much like law can help shape society, so to can society help shape the law.

It speaks volumes the fact that it is incredibly difficult to track down an accurate and updated statistic involving domestic violence in later life, yet it takes less than a minute to find statistics on child or domestic violence rates on both a state and federal level in the United States. Elder abuse lacks a national data collection system and reporting requirements, much like it lacks a definitive definition, and agreed upon statistics. Elder domestic violence is routinely seen as an "invisible" problem, often falling short of the "moral panic" with regard to the broader approach to combating family violence. With out a demand for change little can be done to help curb the systematic abuse of our older Americans. Some believe that apathy and negative attitudes towards "cotton tops" are simply the byproduct of societal and media enforced ageism. Regardless of the root of the cause, we all age, and we all deserve protection.

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November 4, 2013

Infectious Diseases Have Deadly Results in Older Patients


While the most frequent type of abuse and neglect reported in older patients tends to be physical abuse, the majority of mistreatment involves neglect or quality-of-life issues. When a caregiver fails to properly tend to a patient an infectious disease can set in. Infectious diseases account for one third of all deaths in people 65 years and older. Despite advances in antibiotic therapies, infectious diseases continue to be a major cause of death in older adults. Further frustrating the matter is that infections do not present themselves the same way in older patients. Nonspecific complaints and subtle changes in their cognitive impairments, as well as weight loss, are some of the signs indicating that an infection has set in older adults. The role of a caregiver is all that more important in tracking any physical and mental changes in their patients. It is not uncommon for a patient to form an infection especially when a catheter is being used, as was the case in Schoemaker v. Ganon, et al.

In October 2008, the plaintiff Shannon Schoemaker was receiving at home care serviced by defendants Concordia Hospital, Inc., and their agents. On October 13, 2008, Ms. Schoemaker was being fed through an indwelling catheter, the nurse attending to her, nurse Yapp, indicated that there were signs of redness at the site of the catheter. Despite the increase in infectious caused by a catheter and that Ms. Schoemaker exhibited early signs of a possible infection, nurse Yapp failed to take any further steps. There were no plans in place for a follow up even though Ms. Schoemaker displayed signs of a catheter-related line infection. In fact the nurse had no intention of checking on Ms. Schoemaker until eight days later. Two days after nurse Yapp indicated redness at the site of the catheter, Ms. Schoemaker called Concordia Hospital, Inc. Hospital Home Care as Ms. Schoemaker had developed an infection that progressed and rapidly worsened. When Nurse Yapp returned Ms. Schoemaker was in acute respiratory distress with mottled lower legs, purple nail beds, lips, and nose. Ms. Schoemaker was hospitalized for forty-two days and had multiple surgeries where both of her legs were amputated, as well as the tip of her nose, and her left pinky finger.

Before the Court of Common Pleas in Lehigh County the jury rendered a verdict in favor of Ms. Schoemaker where they found the defendants liable. The jury awarded a $23 million in damages to Ms. Schoemaker. While defense argued that the harm Ms. Schoemaker suffered was not causally connected to the infection at her catheter site, the jury concluded that the plaintiff was not contributorily negligent. This verdict is among the highest ever for a medical malpractice case in Lehigh County and among the highest in all of Pennsylvania. It goes to prove the importance of a quality caretaker, and how their decisions and the quality of care rendered can have life or death consequences for elder patients in their care.

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October 16, 2013

Elder Justice is a Necessity in Pennsylvania


Picture for a moment the life you built, saved, and diligently worked for, being stripped away from you at a time when you are unable to fight for yourself. That is what is occurring to millions of older Americans every year. Statistics vary from one in ten older Americans a year being abused, approximately a little over 4 million, to almost 11 percent or 5.7 million. Elder abuse includes physical, emotional, and sexual abuse, as well as, self neglect, and financial exploitation. Often times these patterns of abuse are at the hand of a relative, loved one, or a trusted caregiver or institution. As was true for the actor Mikey Rooney an outspoken advocate of senior rights. On March 2, 2011, Mikey Rooney appeared before a special U.S. Senate committee considering legislation to curb elder abuse. Before the panel, then 90 year old Mikey Rooney claimed he had suffered elder abuse when he was denied basic necessities such as food and medicine, and was financially, verbally, emotionally, and psychologically, tormented at the hands of a stepson and his wife. As ominous as it may sound, everyone must protect themselves and their loved ones from people who prey on our older Americans.

According to the 2010 U.S. Census, the nation's older population is growing and is only projected to further expand as "baby boomers" begin to reach the age of older adults. Pennsylvania has the fourth largest population of older citizens comprising approximately 21.4 percent of the population, or about 2.7 million individuals over the age of 60, with another 2.4 percent over the age of 85. The Pennsylvania State Plan on Aging ("The Report"), is a report released every four years as dictated by federal and state law in order for the commonwealth to receive federal funding under the Older American Act of 1965. The Report estimates that a rapid growth in Pennsylvania's older adult population is slated to reach an epic high by 2030. At which time, another 22.2 percent of the state's population approximately 2.8 million people, who currently fall into the age bracket of 45 to 59 will become incorporated in the older population increase.

The impact of the recent economic recession has greatly affected the surge in reports of abuse, neglect, abandonment, and financial exploitations of Pennsylvania's older population. Individuals in need of older adult protective services have grown exponentially. In 2011-2012 nearly 18,000 adults in Pennsylvania were in need of older adult protective services, that is a 17 percent increase from the previous year. Much like we check on our elderly neighbors when a heat wave strikes, so to should we speak up if we see any signs of elder abuse. If you believe there was an instance of elder abuse please at your earliest convenience contact the nursing home experts and personal injury attorneys at Rosenbaum and Associates for a free consultation. According to the SeniorLAW Center, victims of elder abuse, neglect, and financial exploitation, have three times the risk of dying prematurely. Typically the signs and symptoms may include, bruises or broken bones, dramatic weight loss, confusion due to malnutrition, medications, or an acute illness. Changes in the older adults behavior such as being withdrawn, signing over their house to a relative, or withdrawing large sums of money from a saving account, are all suspect. The Department of Aging's elder abuse hotline 1 (800) 490-8505, is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for any person who believes that an older adult is being abused, neglected, exploited, or abandoned.


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June 14, 2013

Is the Document my Elderly Loved One Signed Really Binding?


Unfortunately, there are people who willingly take advantage of the elderly people in our lives. You may discover that an elderly member of your family has signed a document which appears to eliminate the possibility of bringing a claim for injuries they suffered. That was the case in Philadelphia, where the executor of the estate of Richard MacPherson sought to bring an action for the abuse and neglect Richard suffered while a resident at several hospitals and nursing home facilities.

The defendant health care facilities sought to introduce an arbitration agreement signed by Richard that would have forced his executor into arbitration and set the terms of the arbitration instead of being allowed to file a complaint in Common Pleas Court. The agreement Richard had signed required, among other things, that whoever lose in arbitration pay attorneys' fees and costs, arbitration costs be divided equally, there be no jury trial and that there be a very limited right to appeal the arbitration decision.

The defendants relied on a case called Williams v. Penn Center Rehabilitation and Care, when they claimed that the executor could not file a case and must comply with the terms of the arbitration agreement. There, Mr. Williams testified during a deposition and stated that he understood the process and knew what he was signing when he signed it. In Richard's case, however, he had lost more than twenty pounds in a matter of two months. He was incontinent and entirely reliant on facility staff. His body was covered in blisters, scar wounds, necrotic tissue and lesions. Richard also suffered from various medical maladies including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, depression, Hepatitis C, diabetes and substance abuse. Richard had passed away before this case was filed and therefore could not testify at a deposition regarding his understanding of the arbitration agreement he had signed. Further, defendants' representative who had presented the paperwork to him had no recollection of her conversation with Richard.

Agreements are found to be "procedurally unconscionable" and therefore void when there is a lack of meaningful choice by the weaker party in accepting the terms of the agreement. In finding that this agreement was indeed unconscionable and void the Court here relied on the fact that Richard had no ability to negotiate the terms of the agreement. He signed the agreement on the same day it was presented to him and would not have had an opportunity to review it or discuss it with an attorney or others.

Therefore, due to factors such as the degree of Richard's illness, the fact that the agreement strongly favored the defendants, the inability to obtain testimony from Richard regarding his understanding of the agreement and Richard's inability to negotiate the terms of the contract because of how quickly it was presented and signed, the Court found that the agreement was void and allowed the executor to move forward with his case. Depending on the circumstances surrounding an elderly person's signing of a document it might not actually be binding.

May 6, 2013

Task Force Formed to Study Senior Abuse and Neglect


The Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts (AOPC ) announced the establishment of the Elder Law Task Force formed by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court to investigate the increasing troubles regarding abuse, neglect, guardianship and the access senior citizens have to justice. Justice Debra Todd is chairing the task force, which will recommend possible legislation, amended laws, training and best practices. The task force has one year to finalize their study.

Supreme Court Chief Justice Ronald Castille said that Pennsylvania's older population has significantly increased and as it grows, it is straining the ability of courts to provide services to protect elderly Pennsylvanians. He further stated that the requirements of the elderly will last for years, especially with regard to elder abuse, guardianships and their access to legal recourse. He said that it is time to guarantee that older Pennsylvania citizens will not suffer abuse or the loss of their savings.

Justice Todd has said that our society focuses on child abuse, but rarely addresses the abuse of the elderly. The force is hoping to put new laws into effect before the elderly population swells even more because with more elderly citizens comes more elderly abuse. Nowadays the number of people in the United States who are over 65 years old is greater numerically and proportionately than it has ever been, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Pennsylvania is only exceeded by three other states in terms of elderly population density.

The AOPC gave three instances of elder abuse that would be addressed by the task force. One example was a 64-year-old man from Lancaster who relied on his personal care aide to fix his meals, bathe and dress him because he only had one leg. The police said that the aide neglected the man so severely that the amputee developed skin ulcers that reached the entire way to the man's bone. Due to the extensive wounds, he lost his other leg.

Another example dealt with a Bucks County woman enlisted a neighbor to handle her personal finances since she was entering a nursing home. The neighbor squandered her savings on casino trips, jewelry, posh vacations and golf outings rather than paying her bills. The man has been charged with five felony theft charges.

The National Institute of Justice recently funded a study that reported that in 2009 eleven percent of folks over the age of 60 were the victims of senior abuse. Justice Todd said that at least the two previous cases had been reported. Todd said the U.S. Administration of Aging's National Center on Elder Abuse reported recently that for every one reported case, it's estimated that there are five unreported cases. Justice Todd called that statistic shameful and insisted that Pennsylvania can do a better job protecting seniors from abuse and neglect.

April 29, 2013

Recognizing Nursing Home Abuse


Abuse in nursing homes is a hot button topic. When our elderly relatives and friends reach a point in their lives when they require assisted living or hospitalization, we expect them to have the best care available. However, nursing home residents are routinely mistreated by the people we entrust to take care of them. Frequently, patients will not mention abuse they may be suffering, so it's important for you to know what constitutes nursing home abuse and how to identify it. Some reports say that for every case of nursing home abuse that's reported, there are five cases that are not reported.

Nursing home abuse come sin three forms: neglect, emotional and physical. General, easy-to-spot signs of these types of abuse include:

• Unexplained injuries like bruises, cuts and sores.
• Infections, rashes, rapid weight loss, dehydration and unsanitary conditions.
• Unusual behavior patterns, depression, irritation and isolation.

Neglect

Neglect is the deprivation of care for a resident of a nursing home. Some examples of neglect are failure to feed, refusing to medicate, refusing to aid with a resident's personal hygiene, failure to provide necessary medical care or failure to protect the resident from hazardous conditions like a wet floor or slippery sidewalk. Noticeable symptoms would be lice, bad breath or dirty bedding.

Emotional Abuse

Emotional abuse is harder to detect than physical abuse or neglect, however, emotional abuse can be as harmful to a resident as any type of abuse. Examples of emotional abuse are humiliation, verbal threats or insulting language. Basically, any behavior that causes the resident fear or emotional pain is a form of emotional abuse. Symptoms that a resident has been emotionally abused include:

• Withdrawal from social settings.
• Refusal to speak or answer questions
• Agitation or extreme depression
• Compulsive behavior like thumb sucking, rocking and mumbling

Physical Abuse

Physical abuse is the easiest type of nursing home abuse to see. Examples of physical abuse are rape, failure to feed a resident, striking a resident, too much physical restraint or improperly medicating the resident. There are numerous symptoms of physical abuse.

• Ripped clothing
• Broken eyeglasses
• Bruises
• Cuts
• Burns

Rape is a heinous form of physical abuse. Sexual abuse includes inappropriate touching, rape, forcing a resident to pose for pornographic photos or videos, or exposing a resident to pornographic material. Symptoms of sexual abuse include bruises in the genital area, torn or bloodied underwear, bleeding from the vagina or anus, or the unexplainable occurrence of sexually transmitted diseases. Beware of caregivers who insist on overseeing a resident's time with loves ones. They could be making sure the resident doesn't report them for abuse.

Nursing home abuse is the result of an overworked or an under-trained, underpaid staff. Poor vetting of employees and inadequate personnel can also cause nursing home abuse.

If you suspect abuse, talk to the nurses and doctors at the facility. Try to vary your visitation schedule. If you see symptoms of nursing home abuse, file a report.

April 27, 2013

Woman Denied Treatment after Collapsing in California Retirement Home.


The 911 call was replayed on all the major television news programs after it was released by the Bakersfield Fire Department. A Bakersfield nurse working at a central California retirement home repeatedly refused to give CPR to an 87 year old patient. The patient died as a result of the nurse's refusal to administer aid.

Throughout the distress call, the 911 dispatcher, Tracey Halvorson, urged the nurse to give the collapsed patient the most minimal CPR to keep her breathing until an ambulance could arrive at Glenwood Gardens. The dispatcher asked the nurse, "Is there anybody that's willing to help this lady and not let her die?"

The nurse's answer was hard to believe. She said, "Not at this time." The nurse refused to give her name. She claimed that the nursing facility's patient policy prevented her from either giving the CPR herself or even finding another nurse or bystander to do it. The dispatcher tried to get the nurse to summon paramedics at the nursing home to administer the CPR to the patient who had collapsed in the dining room. The dispatcher even asked the nurse to find another resident, a gardener or even a bystander who did not work at the home to help the stricken patient. Halvorson could be heard asking "Can we flag someone down in the street and get them to help this lady? Can we flag a stranger down? I bet a stranger would help her."

After the ambulance arrived, the patient was transferred to Mercy Southwest Hospital, where she was later declared dead. As a medical malpractice attorney, it's hard for me to believe that a retirement home had a permanent policy denying treatment to residents who are suffering an emergency and are struggling to stay alive. Nursing homes are meant to be secure places for the elderly and infirm to spend their golden years in comfort and safety. But when their very policies prevent administering the most basic type of CPR resuscitation, it makes me wonder whom the nurse was protecting--the nursing home or the patient. It's clear her loyalties were not divided.

Jeffrey Toomer, the executive director of Glenwood Gardens, said the nurse followed the home's policy and did nothing wrong. In a written statement, Toomer said, "In the event of a health emergency at this independent living community our practice is to immediately call emergency medical personnel for assistance and to wait with the individual needing attention until such personnel arrives. That is the protocol we followed." Toomer did say that the retirement home would conduct an internal review of the incident. For what it's worth, he also apologized to the victim's family.

Toomer said all residents of the retirement home are advised of the policy before they move into the home. He said that the adjacent assisted living and skilled nursing facility does not follow the same guidelines.

February 20, 2013

Western Pennsylvania Nursing Home Settles Lawsuit Alleging Worker Attacked Patient


As a Pennsylvania nursing home lawyer, I was pleased to see that a Western Pennsylvania family has settled its Pennsylvania nursing home abuse lawsuit with a nursing home. According to the Altoona Mirror, Affinity Health Services Inc. settled claims that a worker there assaulted a 77-year-old woman two weeks before her death. Christine Welshans was left with bruises and blood on her face after the alleged assault on Aug. 16 or 17 of 2009. The aide accused of hurting Welshans was also accused of assaulting another patient, but the case involving Welshans was closed after her death two weeks later was ruled heart-related. The family's lawsuit noted that the aide, not named in the article, had a history of abusing patients at another home.

Welshans had physical problems, but was pleasant and able to interact with staff until the night of Aug. 16 or the early morning of Aug. 17. That's when the lawsuit alleges she was battered around the face by the aide. A city police report the next day said Welshans had bruising around her eye, her cheek and her chin, and dried blood on her cheek. After the incident, she was agitated and claimed someone had hit her. There was no witness to the attack, but a witness did see the other attack that night, in which the aide pinned a woman's arms to her body using the belt on a robe. Though that incident led to charges, they were dismissed at a preliminary hearing. The lawsuit claimed Affinity was negligent in hiring the aide with the history of violence.

As a Philadelphia injury lawyer, I'd like to know what happened to the aide--who, let us remember, assaulted the other patient in front of witnesses. The article didn't mention whether the aide was disciplined by the state or the company for the assault on the other patient, or for the allegations involving Welshans. It does mention that the law enforcement officer who gave the aide a voice stress test after the incident thought he or she was lying, which was probably important in court. If the aide was not fired after these incidents, Affinity will have a lot of questions to answer--especially if he or she assaults more patients. For-profit nursing homes don't like to lose staff because replacing them costs money, but keeping this kind of employee puts patients in danger. As a Philadelphia medical malpractice lawyer, I hope Affinity did the right thing with this aide.

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December 18, 2012

Nursing Home Workers Caught on Camera Manhandling and Taunting Disabled Patient


As a Pennsylvania nursing home lawyer, I was disappointed to see another case of a hidden camera turning up serious Pennsylvania nursing home abuse. NBC10 Philadelphia reported on an abuse case that was uncovered at a nursing home in Bucks County. Two former employees at the Arbors at Buck Run were caught on camera dumping a wheelchair-bound woman onto a bed, singing and yelling directly into her face. Regina Battles, 20, and Irene Rodriguez, 22, have since been fired and are in county jail on charges of neglect of a care-dependent person, reckless endangerment, harassment and assault. The home has been issued a shutdown order by the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare, but it's appealing that order and will remain open for 30 days.

The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that the victim's daughter planted a hidden camera in the room because she suspected mistreatment of her 83-year-old mother, an Alzheimer's patient. On three consecutive days in October, the camera caught Battles and Rodriguez handling the victim roughly as they helped her into and out of bed. For example, the videos show Battles grabbing and pulling or pushing the woman's legs roughly; and both workers placing her on the floor before shoving her into bed. Another video shows the victim falling out of bed with no help coming and no preventive measures. The woman can clearly be seen crying in some videos and was caught another time covering her face in fear. The victim was taken to the hospital in November with minor wounds to her legs and feet, and is now living at another home.

The Arbors at Bucks Run, a private for-profit home, immediately fired both employees after the family complained to the state. However, the complaints triggered a state inspection Dec. 3 and revoked the home's operating license Dec. 7. The Inquirer said the action was a penalty for hiring Rodriguez and Battles before finishing background checks; PhillyBurbs.com cited gross incompetence, negligence and misconduct. The home may continue operating while it appeals.

As a Philadelphia medical malpractice lawyer, I look forward to hearing more about this case. It has several similarities with the 2011 case involving the Quadrangle nursing home, in which a dementia patient's daughter confirmed suspicions of abuse with a hidden camera. That family went on to file a lawsuit against the home, and the employees caught on camera were criminally charged for their part. The employees in this case have a defense attorney who believes their actions were misinterpreted, but as a Philadelphia injury lawyer, I suspect the videos will speak for themselves when it's time to go before a jury. But more importantly, I hope the regulatory action taken against this home results in long-term improvements in patient safety.

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September 7, 2012

Pennsylvania Nursing Home Sex Abuse News: Sick Charges against Nursing Home Workers in Nearby Staunton


The Pennsylvania nursing home neglect and abuse attorneys here at Rosenbaum & Associates often hear about some awful and depraved acts. These horror stories strengthen our resolve to ensure justice and maximize safety for our clients. Unfortunately, many nursing home abuse victims lack perspective about just how pernicious and disgusting these crimes can be; as a result, they may fail to take swift and effective action to stop them.

Consider, for instance, recent accusations against employees at a nursing home called Envoy of Staunton. The situation at this nursing home is, to put it mildly, disgraceful.

Consider these points:

• One employee, 47-year-old Anthony Johnson, faces both criminal and civil charges in connection with accusations that he groped a 53-year-old patient and compelled a 43-year-old patient to have oral sex with him. One of the family members of the victims finally reported Johnson's actions to the police. Envoy finally fired the nurse's aide, but that punitive action obviously cannot undo the damage done to the assaulted patients.
• Meanwhile, Diane Renee Kline, a 41-year-old administrator and RN, stands accused of failing to report exploitation/abuse to Adult Protective Services. This may not seem to be as "serious" as the crimes that Johnson allegedly committed, but when nursing home watch dogs fail, the system basically collapses;
• 69-year-old Charles Williams, another Envoy employee, stands accused of penetrating a 71-year-old woman with an animate object. In that case, the nursing home immediately contacted police, but still... it does not speak well of a facility when multiple disgusting events occur.

An inspection of this nursing home exposed ten different deficiencies in areas as diverse as food safety, medication management, care and services, and infection control.

The crime of nursing home sexual assault in Philadelphia or elsewhere is grim and terrifying. Some victims may be too terrified to come forward to authorities or even to family members. Others may be too sick or cognitively impaired to report the abuse or even understand what's happening.

An aggressive, successful advocate for victims and their families

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August 16, 2012

Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Law, Designed to Limit Punitive Damages, Stalls in the PA Legislature


As a firm that's very active in Pennsylvania nursing home abuse and neglect law, Rosenbaum & Associates pays close attention to the relevant machinations going on in Harrisburg.

As readers of this blog might remember, last fall, the Pennsylvania House passed a bill supported by associations like Pennsylvania Health Care Association/Center for Assisted Living Management. The bill aimed to limit punitive damages that liable nursing homes would have to pay in certain cases. Damages would be limited to double compensatory damages (at best), with an exception for situations in which intentional misconduct occurred.

The bill would also compel plaintiffs to file in the county in which the abuse/negligence happened -- as opposed to in counties that have a reputation for being more favorable to plaintiffs.

The Nursing Home Associations' push may have stalled out for now, but analysts believe that the effort could be kick started again in the fall.

Advocates of the legislation cite the fact that Pennsylvania's malpractice insurers paid out nearly $320 million in 2011, according to National Practitioner Data Bank research. That would make Pennsylvania the second biggest medical malpractice payout state - ahead of New Jersey and Illinois, but significantly short of New York's numbers (a $680 million payout!)

The Nursing Home Association has also complained that nursing facilities often operate on small margins; and these fragile businesses could lose everything in a single massive lawsuit. Advocates of the bill also point to massive, almost cartoon-like judgments in places like Florida, where two state facilities last year got hit with judgments of $200 million and $900 million, respectively.

What advocates of this Pennsylvania Nursing Home legislation are not paying attention to...

It's true that abuse/neglect lawsuits and settlements can place a burden on facilities. But isn't that burden a good thing? If you or someone you love got hurt in a PA nursing home due to a prescription medication foul-up, bedsore metastasizing into life threatening sepsis, or other horrific scenario, wouldn't you want to be able to leverage a full suite of legal tools to get compensated and to take care of your loved one?

Is our current system always totally fair? No.

But it's more unfair to victims of abuse or neglect than it is to owners of negligent facilities - by a long shot.

Perhaps if advocacy groups like the Pennsylvania Health Care Association/Center for Assisted Living Management spent more time identifying best practices for senior care -- and punishing facilities for straying from a high standard -- there would be less need for law firms and less need for the kind of legal actions that these groups rail against.

The horror stories that we've personally heard - and have helped to abate - along with compelling statistics at both the national and state levels suggest that the onus is on delinquent nursing facilities. These facilities need to do a better job of taking care of people: of fulfilling their fiduciary responsibilities not only to their patients but also to our communities.


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June 7, 2012

Guilty Verdict in Nursing Home Manslaughter Case: Nurse Who Gave Alzheimer's Patients Morphine Gets 5 Months Behind Bars


As a Pennsylvania nursing home abuse attorney, I was shocked and saddened to read about the tragedy of Rachel Holliday, an 84 year old patient at a Chapel Hill nursing home, who passed away after being horribly abused. She allegedly got sick after being doped with morphine by a nurse who apparently didn't want to be bothered to care for her patients.

Nurse Angela Almore was sentenced last Monday to five months behind bars and two and a half years of probation as part of a plea deal she made with prosecutors. The allegations against Almore were all too familiar to anyone who has studied the nursing home abuse case literature. Nurse Almore had been on duty at Britthaven Nursing Home in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, on February 13 and February 14, 2010. On Valentine's Day evening, Holliday started suffering respiratory distress; and she had to be rushed to UNC Hospitals for treatment.

Doctors at first couldn't figure out what was wrong with her. They eventually realized that there were opiates in her system. This was confusing, since she had not been prescribed opiates.

As her medical crisis deepened, other patients in the Alzheimer's unit began to exhibit lethargy and signs of health problems. Many of them needed to be rushed to hospital as well. All told, 14 patients in the unit tested positive for opiates - and only one had been prescribed opiates.

Sadly, Rachel Holliday passed away from morphine toxicity. The other affected patients fortunately survived their overdoses. Investigators with the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation found circumstantial evidence pegging Almore as the responsible party. The local district attorney, Lamar Proctor Jr., told the judge in the case that "[Almore] made some statements that she didn't want to see patients that night...[so] she knocked all their a**es out."

After reflecting on the gravity and sadness of the situation, we'd be in remiss if we did not try to extract useful lessons. Here's one key takeaway: when caregivers shirk their duties - even innocuously -- the effects on patients can be profound, damaging, and perhaps even fatal.

At her trial, Almore openly sobbed and expressed contrition. But what she did cannot be undone. Unfortunately, the slight errors of omission - or acts of disrespect - that often constitute Pennsylvania nursing home abuse/neglect can easily create havoc and pain for elderly residents and their families.

That said, building a compelling case against a nursing home or a nursing home employee can be surprisingly difficult. At Rosenbaum & Associates, we have nearly two and a half decades of experience helping hurt elderly patients and their relatives obtain compensation and justice.

If you're confused or frustrated about what's happened to your loved one, our Pennsylvania personal injury team can empower you and help you develop a complete, aggressive strategy to get you results.

March 20, 2012

CMS Announces Campaign to Reduce Unnecessary Use of Antipsychotics in Nursing Homes


I've written here many times as a Pennsylvania nursing home lawyer about the dangers of overusing antipsychotic drugs in nursing homes. Sometimes called "chemical restraints" because the practice effectively prevents patients from being physically or mentally active, antipsychotics were once commonly used off-label in dementia patients. Their use has been curbed somewhat since 2005, when the FDA issued its strongest possible warning that studies have associated atypical antipsychotic use in the elderly with increased risk of death; the agency extended that warning in 2008 to all types of antipsychotics. Nonetheless, a federal report last year found the drugs are still used more widely in nursing homes than they should be, with numerous Medicare recipients getting the drugs for no medically accepted reason or in a way that violates federal standards.

Now, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has announced a campaign to stop unnecessary use of antipsychotics. According to McKnight's Long-Term Care News, CMS will promote alternatives to medication to control behaviors among dementia patients that are violent or otherwise difficult for caregivers to handle. These can include intervening in patients' behavior, better communication with patients when possible, and treating any problem that might be the real cause of an outburst, such as undiagnosed pain. Nursing home industry observers also called for homes to recheck whether there was ever a valid indication for the medication, and whether it's still valid today. McKnight's reported that this issue has been front and center partly because of interest from Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-IA, who may have driven the CMS initiative. That initiative will kick off March 29 with educational programs as well as increased regulatory oversight.

As a Philadelphia medical malpractice lawyer, I applaud Grassley and the no doubt many others who have been working to keep this issue front and center. Because of their illness, nursing home patients with dementia can rarely speak for themselves, so it's vital that we speak for them. That's particularly true for patients who are receiving antipsychotics unnecessarily, because a side effect of those drugs is sedation. (Indeed, it's possible that sedation is the goal of homes that overuse the drugs.) Like other powerful prescription drugs, however, antipsychotics carry even more serious side effects, including large weight gain, diabetes, sudden cardiac death, stroke and more. That's why knowingly misusing the drugs in elderly people, just to avoid taking the expensive staff time necessary to intervene in their behavior, is a form of Pennsylvania nursing home abuse.

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