Nursing Home Workers Caught on Camera Manhandling and Taunting Disabled Patient


December 18, 2012

As a Pennsylvania nursing home lawyer, I was disappointed to see another case of a hidden camera turning up serious Pennsylvania nursing home abuse. NBC10 Philadelphia reported on an abuse case that was uncovered at a nursing home in Bucks County. Two former employees at the Arbors at Buck Run were caught on camera dumping a wheelchair-bound woman onto a bed, singing and yelling directly into her face. Regina Battles, 20, and Irene Rodriguez, 22, have since been fired and are in county jail on charges of neglect of a care-dependent person, reckless endangerment, harassment and assault. The home has been issued a shutdown order by the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare, but it's appealing that order and will remain open for 30 days.

The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that the victim's daughter planted a hidden camera in the room because she suspected mistreatment of her 83-year-old mother, an Alzheimer's patient. On three consecutive days in October, the camera caught Battles and Rodriguez handling the victim roughly as they helped her into and out of bed. For example, the videos show Battles grabbing and pulling or pushing the woman's legs roughly; and both workers placing her on the floor before shoving her into bed. Another video shows the victim falling out of bed with no help coming and no preventive measures. The woman can clearly be seen crying in some videos and was caught another time covering her face in fear. The victim was taken to the hospital in November with minor wounds to her legs and feet, and is now living at another home.

The Arbors at Bucks Run, a private for-profit home, immediately fired both employees after the family complained to the state. However, the complaints triggered a state inspection Dec. 3 and revoked the home's operating license Dec. 7. The Inquirer said the action was a penalty for hiring Rodriguez and Battles before finishing background checks; PhillyBurbs.com cited gross incompetence, negligence and misconduct. The home may continue operating while it appeals.

As a Philadelphia medical malpractice lawyer, I look forward to hearing more about this case. It has several similarities with the 2011 case involving the Quadrangle nursing home, in which a dementia patient's daughter confirmed suspicions of abuse with a hidden camera. That family went on to file a lawsuit against the home, and the employees caught on camera were criminally charged for their part. The employees in this case have a defense attorney who believes their actions were misinterpreted, but as a Philadelphia injury lawyer, I suspect the videos will speak for themselves when it's time to go before a jury. But more importantly, I hope the regulatory action taken against this home results in long-term improvements in patient safety.

If your family has suffered a loss or a serious injury because of neglect or abuse in a nursing home, don't hesitate to call Rosenbaum & Associates for a free consultation. You can reach us through our website or call toll-free at 1-800-7-LEGAL-7.

Similar blog posts:

Family Announces Pennsylvania Nursing Home Abuse Lawsuit Against Quadrangle

Pennsylvania Nursing Home License Revoked After Employees Caught Abusing Woman

Ohio Nursing Home Aide Pleads Guilty to Abuse of Dementia Patient Caught on Camera