CDC Calls for Increased Strep Throat Investigations After Philadelphia Nursing Home Outbreak


November 7, 2011

As a Philadelphia injury lawyer, I was disappointed to see that a Philly-area nursing home is getting national attention for the wrong reasons. As the Philadelphia Inquirer reported Oct. 29, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention called out a Montgomery County nursing home for having "one of the largest and most prolonged" outbreaks of streptococcus infections in a nursing facility. The CDC report did not name the home, but the Inquirer determined that the home is Arista Care at Meadow Springs in the town of Plymouth Meeting, and an administrator there confirmed the outbreak. In all, 13 residents had invasive strep and 10 had noninvasive strep. The CDC urged all long-term care facilities to investigate even a single case of strep and ensure they have good practices for controlling infections.

Two people died at Arista Care, but the home disputes that the cases were directly linked to strep. However, the CDC and the Pennsylvania health department both had records of multiple infection control problems at Arista Care, including ineffective "hand-hygiene practices." State records showed that not every room had gloves and that the facility had housekeeping problems. The outbreak started in October of 2009 and was likely carried into the facility by more than one source, the article said. Near the beginning, admissions to the facility were suspended for about two weeks while five people, including four workers, were treated for the infection. In April of 2010, Artsta Care hired a full-time worker whose job is infection prevention. The spokesperson also mentioned adding hand sanitizer dispensers to every room and testing each new patient for strep. A state spokesperson said there have been no new cases since December of 2010.

It's a relief to hear that this home is getting praised by the state for taking the necessary steps to stop the outbreak. But as a Pennsylvania nursing home lawyer, I think it's worth asking what kind of ineffective practices may have led to the outbreak in the first place. Infectious disease control is absolutely vital at nursing homes, because nursing homes combine two features that make outbreaks particularly risky: vulnerable older people and many people living in close quarters. Age and illness can both depress an individual's immune system; once the infection takes hold, age makes the victim more likely to develop a complication like dehydration. And living in close quarters makes it very easy to spread an infectious disease like strep, which spreads through close contact between people. As a Philadelphia medical malpractice lawyer, I hope nursing homes take the CDC's warning to heart, because the risk is severe.

Rosenbaum & Associates represents families across eastern Pennsylvania that lost a loved one or suffered an injury or illness due to neglect or abuse at nursing homes. For a free, confidential evaluation of your case, call us today at 1-800-7-LEGAL-7 or send us a message through our website.

Similar blog posts:

Eleven People at Two Western Pennsylvania Nursing Homes Develop Legionnaires Disease

Pennsylvania Nursing Home Receives Second Round of Citations From State DPW

Article Reminds Pennsylvania Nursing Homes to Beware of Spreading Viruses in Winter